Leadership form For A 21st Century Health Care Organization

Leadership form For A 21st Century Health Care Organization




There is a growing trend for leaders to break the old autocratic form of leadership to newer models using the concepts of shared and participatory leadership. With the every increasing complexity of health care delivery and the new skilled work force, leaders will have to communicate in an air where a reaching organization objective is a shared responsibility. According to Bennis, Spreitzer and Cummings (2001) in the future the scenery of health care organization will become more decentralized, which will promote agility, proactivity, and autonomy. Future leaders may move away from singular roles to shared leadership networks that may themselves alter the foundations of the organization. The demands for shared leadership or leaders shifting roles on teams will continue to increase. Health care organization will foster the development and empowerment of people, building teamwork and shared leadership on all levels. The leaders of the future will be guides, asking for input and sharing information. Telling people what to do and how to do it will become a thing of the past (Bennis, Spreitzer and Cummings, 2001). In the 21st century the dynamics of health care will offer leaders who have the ability to motivate and empower others a platform to maximize an organization human resources. Leadership will have to be committed to encourage a two way communication in which the vision meets both the organizations objectives and the employee’s needs. This assignment will develop a leadership form for the 21st century that addresses the role of commitment form of shared and participatory leadership in health care organizations.

Commitment form of leadership

Fullam, Lando, Johansen, Reyes, and Szaloczy (1998) suggest effective leadership style is an integral part of creating an ecosystem that nurtures the development of an empowered group. Leader effectiveness is simply the extent to which the leader’s group is successful in achieving organizational goals (Fullam et al., 1998). In the 21st century health care organizations will need leaders that are committed to developing employees in a team ecosystem. In an ecosystem where leadership is transferable according to objective commitment leadership has a shared purpose. Kerfoot and Wantz (2003) suggested in inspired organizations where people are committed and excited about their work, compliance to standards and the constant search for excellence happens automatically. In these organizations, compliance continues when the leader is not present. This kind of leadership requires the team leader to use all obtainable method to create three conditions among individuals: (a) shared purpose, (b) self-direction, and (c) quality work. Leaders who create commitment among their employees believe in creating a shared vision that generates a sense of shared destiny for everyone (Kerfoot & Wantz, 2003).

Involving others in leadership is a rare course of action which is deeply rooted in individuals believing they are a part of the time of action of meeting organizational objective and purpose. Atchison and Bujak (2001) suggest involving others in the time of action is important because people tend to sustain that which they help to create. People resent being changed, but they will change if they understand and desire the change and control the time of action. Sharing information contributes a sense of participation and allows people to feel acknowledged and respected (Atchison & Bujak, 2001 p. 141).

Toseland, Palmer-Ganeles, and Chapman (1986) suggest when individual leaders cooperate and proportion their skill and skills, a more comprehensive decision making course of action can be achieved instead of when leaders work independently. For example, in a geriatric team, a psychiatric nurse may rule a group focused on heath concerns, a social worker may rule a therapy group, or a mental-health therapy aide may rule a structured reality-arrangement group (Toseland et al., 1986). Shared commitment form the leadership in the future will help to develop, coordinate, and integrate the complicate and ever changing health care setting for the 21st century.

Respect for authority and work ethic

Haase-Herrick (2005) suggested shared leadership gives the opportunity to enhance or build trust among individuals. Leadership is mobilized around refining the roles of individuals creating positive health practice environments that sustain the work of the group (Haase-Herrick, 2005). Leadership ability to rule a team in ways that build morale and reinforce work ethics empowers others to perform to their possible in a group. Leadership is the ability to rule individuals towards achieving a shared goal. Leadership builds teams and gains the members shared commitment to the team course of action by creating shared emotion within the group (Pescosolido, 2002).

Collaboration among leaders in health care

There are new models that are emerging which add a new perspective on how to produce effective collaboration within leadership. Wieland et al., (1996) discussed transdisciplinary teams in health care settings, where members have developed sufficient trust and mutual confidence to include in teaching and learning across all levels of leadership. The collaborating is shared but the ultimate responsibility for effectiveness is provided in their place by other team members. The shared responsibility for example might be a situation where clinicians on a team each serve in a leadership role in spite of of their particular disciplinary skill (Wieland et al., 1996). The shared commitment form of leadership allows for the independence and equality of the contributing professions while pressuring team members to unprotected to consensus about group goals and priorities. It is important to press the importance of collaboration in a complicate and changing health care ecosystem. The focus on the dominant purpose for partnership of leaders will ultimately rest on the shared belief in meeting organizational goals though a collaborative effort. Atchison and Bujak (2001) suggest it is important to reemphasize the importance of keeping everyone informed on the dominant purpose of achieving success though a collaborative effort. Clarifying expectations and specifically illustrating how hypothesizedv changes are likely to affect the participants is important in achieving commitment leadership (Atchison & Bujak, 2001)

Leadership competency on all levels

The ability to rule in the 21st century requires leaders to be competent in motivating and empowering others to perform to their maximum possible. According to Elsevier (2004) leadership is the ability to rule a team or number of individuals in ways which build morale, generate ownership and harness energies and talents towards achieving a shared goal. The leadership competency is all about motivating and empowering others while accomplishing organizational objectives. Leadership is the means in which the vision is clarified though the encouragement of two-way communication on all levels of the organization (Elsevier, 2004).

Leaders in the 21st century will have to be competent in identifying change as they occur and encourage others to adjust to those changes for the mutual assistance of achieving objectives. Elsevier (2004) suggest leaders will have to be comfortable with change because which change comes new opportunities for collaboration among followers and peers (Elsevier, 2004). Improving the results of change initiatives while making sure those changes are fully understood will be a priority for leaders who choice to rule by commitment leadership.

Leadership as a changing agent

Longest, Rakich and Darr (2000) suggest organizational change in health care organization does not occur absent certain conditions. meaningful are the people who are catalysts for change and who can manage the organizational change course of action. Such people are called change agents. Anyone can be a change agent, although this role usually is played by leadership. Change agents must recognize that any organizational change involves changing individuals. Individuals will not change with out motivation introduces by the changing agent. The changing agent must create a body of shared values and attitudes, a new consensus in which meaningful individuals with in an organization reinforce one another in selling the new way and in defending it against opposition (Longest, Rakich and Darr, 2000). As health care organizations change in the 21st century successful leaders must have the skills that are necessary to make change possible with in teams of individuals. Longest, Rakich and Darr (2000) suggest one of the important category of change is team building or team development, which “remove barriers to group effectiveness, develop self sufficiency in managing group course of action, and ease the change course of action (Longest, Rakich and Darr, 2000). A leader who leads by commitment must seek to minimize the resistances to change by building a consensus of objectives with in the organizations culture.

Conclusion

Leadership in the complicate health care ecosystem in the 21st century will need individuals to be committed to the promotion of team effectiveness. Sarner (2006) suggest leadership is a “strength- and value-filled relationship between leaders and followers who intend real changes that mirror their mutual purposes and goals.” In plainer language, leadership is the dynamic that galvanizes individuals into groups to make things different or to make things better — for themselves, for their enterprise, for the world around them. The basic elements of leadership have remained more or less continued: intelligence, insight, instinct, vision, communication, discipline, courage, constancy (Sarner, 2006). In the 21st century leaders must know how to gather, sort, and structure information, and then connect it in new ways to create clear objectives that satisfy both the organization and individuals needs. The important skill that can be learning during this course of action of leadership is the ability to listen to colleagues and collaborators for the only purpose of foster a shared consensus. In order to communicate a vision in the future a commitment leader must work with others and sometimes defer some part of the leadership course of action to ensure organizational objectives are achieved.

References

Atchison, T. A. & Bujak, J. S. (2001). Leading transformational change: The physician-executive partnership. Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press.

Elsevier, R. (2004). Leadership and change arrangement. Competency & Intelligence 12(2), 16-17. Retrieved October 8, 2006 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/delivery?vid=14&hid=16&sod

Haase-Herrick, K. (2005). The opportunities of stewardship: Leadership for the future. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29(2), 115-118. Retrieved March 23, 2006, from Ovid Technologies, Inc. Email Service.

Kerfoot, K., & Wantz, S. (2003). Compliance leadership: The 17th century form that doesn’t work. Dermatology Nursing, 15(4), 377. Retrieved June 3, 2005, from http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index

Longest, B., Rakich, J. S. & Darr, K. (2000). Managing health sets organizations and systems (4th ed.) Baltimore, MD: Health Professions Press, Inc.

Pescosolido, A. T. (2002). Emergent leaders as managers of group emotion. The Leadership Quarterly 185(2002), xxx-xxx. Retrieved October 5, 2006 from http://www.unh.edu/management/faculty/ob/tp/Emergent%20Leaders%20as%20Managers%20of%20Group%20Emotion.pdf

Sarner, M. (2006). Can leadership be learned? FastCompany.com Retrieved October 8, 2006

from http://www.fastcompany.com/articles/archive/msarner.html

Toseland, R. W., Palmer-Ganeles, J., & Chapman. D. (1986). Teamwork in psychiatric settings. National Association of Social Workers, Inc. Retrieved May 29, 2005, from [http://www.apollolibrary.com/srp/login.asp]

Wieland, D., Kramer, J, Waite, M. S., Rubenstein, L. Z., & Laurence, Z. (1996). The interdisciplinary team in geriatric care. The American Behavioral Scientist. Retrieved May 1, 2005, from [http://proquest.umi.com/pqdwebindex=1]




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