Australia Covid news live update: NSW records 863 situations, 15 deaths; Vi…




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Covid-19 vaccine safety data for adolescents has been published by AusVaxSafety, a collaboration between immunisation providers, research institutions, and state and territory governments which has been monitoring vaccine side-effects.

Their data shows adolescents aged 12+19 years are reporting similar short-term vaccine side effects to those reported by older Australians. Commonly reported among adolescents aged 12+19 years is pain at the injection site, headache and fatigue. These shared negative events are connected to the immune response following immunisation, are expected to occur, and are generally mild and permanent, with the overwhelming majority of recipients recovering within three days.

AusVaxSafety has so far received more than 150,000 completed day three safety surveys from adolescents aged 12+19 years who received their Covid-19 vaccine and the data examination has not detected any safety concerns for this age group.

On the whole, data reported by this age group were largely consistent with those seen in AusVaxSafety examination of Covid-19 vaccine safety at a population-wide level.

Adolescents aged 12+19 years reported fewer negative events and had similar rates of medical attendance in the three days following Pfizer Covid-19 vaccination when compared to the adult Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine recipient population.

However, 18 to 19-year-olds reported more negative events and had slightly higher rates of medical attendance, following measure one only, in the three days following AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccination, compared to the adult AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine recipient population. Medical attendance in 18 to 19-year-olds following measure two was in line with the broader population.

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As the CFMEU headquarters in Melbourne is named as a tier one exposure site following the protests outside its office last week, health officials say negotiations are nevertheless current to re-open construction in Victoria following the two-week suspension.

The suspension is due to expire on Tuesday, but acting chief health officer, Prof. Ben Cowie, said he could not say whether construction workers will be allowed back to work next week.

He said positive negotiations are happening, and it will depend on the safe settings on worksites, including vaccination rates and ventilation.

He said:


They are basic elements. Looking at the kind of construction and fit outs clearly presenting certain risk, such as adding walls that reduces ventilation and increases viral load if there is somebody infected, you know, surveillance testing, there’s certainly aspects of that, in addition as waste water surveillance has been a big part of the response. There are a lot of ways we can make it a lot of ways we can make it as safe as we can.

Cowie would not confirm reports the CFMEU Victorian president was among several union workers to test positive after the protests last week, with the CFMEU headquarters being named a tier one exposure site.




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Four officials from the Victorian construction union have tested positive for Covid-19 and the union’s secretary, John Setka, is in isolation after an sudden increase following violent protests at its Melbourne headquarters last week.

The CFMEU’s headquarters was declared a tier-one exposure site on Wednesday, and the union released a statement blaming the “reckless and irresponsible behaviour of protesters” last week for an sudden increase of the virus among union staff.

“Last week’s protests put union officials and police at risk with infected demonstrators showing no attention to the wellbeing of people affected by their actions,” the union said in a statement.

“Their reckless behaviour has resulted in transmission to union staff and officials who were not involved in the protest. To date, four positive situations have been recorded.”

The union confirmed the designation of the headquarters as a tier-one exposure site had forced staff, including Setka, into isolation.
The union slating blame on the protestors for the sudden increase comes after at the minimum two protesters who marched in anti-lockdown and mandatory vaccination protests last week have tested positive for Covid-19.

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Victoria has not however finalised plans to shorten the gap between doses of the Pfizer vaccine from six to three weeks, with health minister Martin Foley stating Victoria needed more certainty about supply from the federal government.

Shortening the gap between doses will speed up when Victoria reaches its 70% and 80% double measure targets that will cause the end of lockdown and the re-opening of the state.

Nine Newspapers reported on Wednesday the gap would be cut, after assurances were provided by the federal government on supply of the Pfizer vaccine. However Foley said it would likely not be finalised until later this week.
He said:


I have been asked about this a lot, we have seen some interesting reports. We will reduce the six weeks down to three weeks the moment we are confident we have the supply to unprotected to that to bring forward the double-measure rate to the earliest possible opportunity we can. That requires us to have confirmation of supply over October. I can assure you that as recently as last night, the very productive discussions we have with senior officials at the commonwealth reconfirmed that as of last night we nevertheless do not have confirmation of that last week in October.

I have seen all sorts of interesting reports to the contrary. The direct advice from the most senior supplies in the commonwealth government is that we will have that advice by the end of the week. If that advice comes in and we can lock in changes, we will do so the minute we possibly can because everyone wants to bring forward those double-measure dates but we can’t do it at the expense cancelling those vaccination programs, and we can’t lock it in to then only disappoint people who would expect us to deliver that second measure and the timeframes we committed to.




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Victoria has not however finalised plans to shorten the gap between doses of the Pfizer vaccine from six to three weeks, with health minister Martin Foley stating Victoria needed more certainty about supply from the federal government.

Shortening the gap between doses will speed up when Victoria reaches its 70% and 80% double measure targets that will cause the end of lockdown and the re-opening of the state.

Nine Newspapers reported on Wednesday the gap would be cut, after assurances were provided by the federal government on supply of the Pfizer vaccine. However Foley said it would likely not be finalised until later this week.

He said:


I have been asked about this a lot, we have seen some interesting reports. We will reduce the six weeks down to three weeks the moment we are confident we have the supply to unprotected to that to bring forward the double-measure rate to the earliest possible opportunity we can. That requires us to have confirmation of supply over October. I can assure you that as recently as last night, the very productive discussions we have with senior officials at the commonwealth reconfirmed that as of last night we nevertheless do not have confirmation of that last week in October.

I have seen all sorts of interesting reports to the contrary. The direct advice from the most senior supplies in the commonwealth government is that we will have that advice by the end of the week. If that advice comes in and we can lock in changes, we will do so the minute we possibly can because everyone wants to bring forward those double-measure dates but we can’t do it at the expense cancelling those vaccination programs, and we can’t lock it in to then only disappoint people who would expect us to deliver that second measure and the timeframes we committed to.

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